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The Origin Story of the CultureLab Audio Postcards

I was ten when the martial law was introduced in Poland.

Suddenly, there were tanks in the streets and members of the Polish opposition movement, Solidarity, got arrested and thrown into jail without a trial.

The mass media, public services, healthcare, power stations, coal mines, seaports, railway stations, and most key factories were placed under military management.

My parents were told in no uncertain terms that they would either follow military orders or face a court-martial. It was a really dark time. 

300px T 55A Martial law Poland

But for me, as a kid, the worst part about the martial law was the sudden lack of mail. 

A window into a better world

Mail had been a major highlight throughout my childhood. There was no doubt in my mind that we got the coolest mail on the street (perhaps even in the whole town!)

In a country completely isolated from the rest of the world, my family would regularly receive postcards from Antwerp, Hamburg, Los Angeles, New York, Colombo, Piraeus and other amazing places. They were mailed by my dad's best friend, uncle Malinowski. He was the chief engineer on a ship and the only person I knew who was allowed to travel outside of Poland. 

For years, I’d run to the mailbox the moment I spotted the postman. He didn’t always bring a postcard. But when he did, I’d clutch it as if it were the most precious object in the world, rush back home and demand that my grandma or my parents tell me about the place that the postcard was mailed from. 

At night, I’d take the postcards to bed. I’d look at them in the dim light of my nightstand lamp again and imagine that uncle Malinowski’s greetings contained a secret message, a message written in some sort of code, a message that would help me figure everything out. 

Those postcards were my window into a better world, into a better future. Without them, I felt lost and directionless.

christopher flynn TEX3MKBZwLA unsplash

The antidote to lockdown blues

40 years later, I’m in lockdown again, this time in Italy - the place to follow China as the largest outbreak of Coronavirus in the world.

But this time, we are not alone - there are billions of people in the same situation, all around the globe.

I know that it can feel dark, scary, and uncertain. And in my experience, in times like this... getting mail helps. 

And so I thought: what if we started sending postcards with messages of hope and solidarity, with messages on how to start figuring this all out? The sort of messages that contain all that we need to hear to stop freaking out and start moving in the right direction? 

We’ll keep posting these messages as long as it feels like we need them.

Humanity has been through worse than this. I know that we will pull through this - and we have a chance to emerge stronger on the other side. 

If you'd like to get these postcards on a regular basis, sign up to the CultureLab Insider here

Stay safe and healthy. 

 

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WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT ME?

I’m a culture strategist and I work with leaders
and teams around the globe to help them create
a culture that brings their  boldest vision to life.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

  • I love spending time with my husband and my friends, reading, walking in the park near my home, dancing Argentinian tango and traveling. My two favourite places on Earth are Venice in Italy and the Serengeti in Africa.

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Let me guess: you are here because we met in real life, someone you trust mentioned my name or you’ve seen one of my posts on social media.

Whatever brought you here, I’m thrilled that you’ve come around.

This site is where I share useful resources, information and thoughts about what’s widely considered a somewhat nebulous and complex topic:
the organisational culture - and things related to it.

If you work in an organisation, your culture is probably the most powerful force shaping yours and your organisation’s future. And yet, you are probably still not clear about how to deal with it in the most effective way.

My mission is to demystify organisational culture, to make it more accessible and less overwhelming in its complexity.

I hope that what you find here will help to do just that!